Sounds like perhaps your chocolate seized? Can’t say for sure but a few tips for next time: 1. Use good quality chocolate like Ghirardelli…don’t use Baker’s, as it tends to seize more easily. 2. Melt it double-boiler style, especially if you are using an electric range (it’s harder to control the heat with electric). Set a bowl over a pot with some barely simmering water. This takes longer but melts the ingredients more gently.
Hi Monica. Thank you for the feedback. I will change the recipe to omit the almond milk, but I have found that most often the reason the pudding mixture fails to set is because it wasn’t cooked enough. I’ll see what I can do to make the recipe a little easier. Thanks again for the feedback, I read each comment and really appreciate it. Enjoy your week. -Kim
So, you’ve decided to start a sugar detox. Or maybe you just want to cut your intake to see if you feel better without so much of the sweet stuff. But eliminating sugar from your diet shouldn’t mean eliminating dessert too. Here are 13 refined sugar–free recipes people are pinning, mixing, and baking, according to Pinterest. Each is sweetened using natural sugar or sugar substitutes, making them healthier yet still decadent options.
These amazing low carb gluten free pumpkin bars with cream cheese frosting are the best pumpkin treat one can ask for. Filled with sweet sugar free chocolate chips, chopped nuts and pumpkin seeds, you'll want to make this pumpkin snack all year long! This recipe can easily be customized to be dairy … [Read more...] about Low Carb Gluten Free Pumpkin Bars with Cream Cheese Frosting
The simple fact is that many of us eat more carbohydrates than our bodies can handle. We can see this with diabetics who eat too much of a certain food and lose control of their blood sugar. The aim of a low-carb diet, therefore, is to reduce the consumption of carbohydrates to keep our GI in check, while maintaining good nutrition and achieving sustainable weight loss.
Loathsome to such as are not acquainted with it, having a scum or froth that is very unpleasant to taste. Yet it is a drink very much esteemed among the Indians, where with they feast noble men who pass through their country. The Spaniards, both men and women, that are accustomed to the country, are very greedy of this Chocolaté. They say they make diverse sorts of it, some hot, some cold, and some temperate, and put therein much of that 'chili'; yea, they make paste thereof, the which they say is good for the stomach and against the catarrh.[22]
In addition to diabetics, there are a growing number of people who are pre-diabetic, insulin resistant and reactive hypoglycemic who really need to restrict sugar intake. I’ve also read that sugar as well as salt make contribute to high blood pressure and cancer. Let’s agree that sugar isn’t too good for us, and that, even we who love chocolate, need to keep it to a minimum. So far, sugar substitutes are not a satisfactory solution for a number of reasons, not the least of which is poor flavor. Perhaps, that’s because most big chocolate makers aren’t paying enough attention to fine flavor cacao. Rather, the approach is to use commodity chocolate and throw in anything that will sweeten it. That’s why the only ones who can lead us to a solution are our craft chocolate makers, because it’s all about the flavor. There a a few excellent 100% bars out there–including Fruition’s–but most are not palatable enough for the average consumer. Still, we should encourage more people to try 80% +, because if you’re only consuming 1-2 squares a day, you’re probably not getting enough sugar for it to be concerning. You’ll notice that ‘s a small portion of chocolate. True! It’s less than the portion size described on most labels. But it’s my opinion that if you’re truly savoring those 1or 2 squares slowly, truly tasting and enjoying them, it should be enough. At least, it is for me. You can still lose weight consuming that amount, too. So maybe the underlying problem is actually mindless consumption. If my remarks intrigue you, I invite you to read my book: Deep Tasting: A Chovolate Lover’ Guide to Meditation.
Asher’s milk chocolate is so lush and creamy that, with just one taste, you’ll never be able to turn down another piece of Asher’s chocolate!  All of our best selling chocolates, including Chocolate Covered Pretzels, Sea Salt Caramels, and Almond Bark, are drenched in thick milk chocolate – the same chocolate recipe that has been your favorite for over 100 years. We carefully place these and other specially-crafted milk chocolate treats in our handsome gourmet gift baskets, perfect for presentation to your favorite loved ones. 
Hi, I’m still a bit skeptical, I have seen some of my friends do the keto diet, and have had good results. Though I am still not sure about the idea of the fats being eaten. They say they eat meat with the fat and must do so, is this correct? Also isn’t this not good for the body especially for the kidneys? Second, can a diabetic do this diet? There are many questions running through my head.
“It is definitely worth the time it took to make and I don’t think it took much longer than when I used to make a high sugar dessert similar to this as I always made my chocolate cream layer from scratch. If someone wanted to cut the time then they could do like you suggested and make some of it the day before. What I love about this recipe is it is so similar to what has been one of my family’s favorite desserts. It felt like welcoming an old friend…but so much better because of the carb count. The high sugar version of this dessert was the first dessert I ever made for my hubby…so it was great to welcome it back into our lives!!! (I love your addition of the chocolate to the shortbread crust!)
A powdered sweetener works best. Granular would be the next best thing – everything would still come together the same way, but you might taste the granules if they don’t fully dissolve, so it wouldn’t be as smooth. I don’t think liquid sweeteners like honey, agave, or maple syrup would work, because they’d add extra liquid and would require consistency adjustments for the other ingredients. (You can try, I’m just not sure about the results.)
Then don’t give up the fruit! Go for it. You sound like a fit and active person within the normal weight range. Generally the advice is to stay off excessive fruit, and high sugar fruit especially if people are overweight or have other health issues, then in that case fruit is not your friend. But with everything, eat within your personal carb limitations and eat to what is appropriate to you. Whole fruit is somewhat self limiting due to the fibre and water anyhow. You obviously have worked out a fabulous routine and it is working, so why change, stick with it Tom and enjoy 🙂
The benefits of low-carb diets are mostly due to a reduction, or in some cases almost an entire elimination, of glucose. Glucose, or other molecules that can turn into glucose once eaten, are found in all carbohydrate foods — whether grains, legumes, starchy vegetables, fruits and sweeteners of all kinds. To a lesser degree even nuts, seeds and vegetables contain glucose.
Making lifestyle changes is never easy, particularly if you have people or habits that sway you from reaching the goals you've set for yourself. To prevent this, surround yourself with people who understand your goals and may even join you in making the same changes. This is especially important during the first three months of adopting a low-carb diet (or any lifestyle change, for that matter), after which practices tend to settle in as routine.

Hi I’m only new to LCHF and you’re information has been amazing, thank you! I have one question though I’m doing well cutting out sugar, breads etc but just wondering do I need to portion control my meals? Typically I have a 2 egg one letter with cheese, spinach and mushrooms for breakfast. Then warm chicken salad with rocket, cucumber, tomatoes, Persia fetta and a poaxhed egg. Dinner yellow curry with brocoli, carrot on cauliflower rice. Snack a low carb cheesecake, nuts maybe a smoothie.


Many people starting out go by the rule of 5g carbs per 100g. I totally empathise with you about fearing the fat. I slowly reduced my carb and slowly increased my healthy fats until I got to a comfortable level (which may be different for everyone). Don’t overdo the fat, we want to be using our bodies fat stores, but we do need to eat enough to keep us full and keep the carbs away. So eat healthy fat until full, eat meals until no longer hungry, and remove processed food from your diet and you almost become low carb by default.
These delicious low carb keto cinnamon rolls are made with psyllium husk powder and can easily be made dairy free.  Thanks to the psyllium, the dough is easy to roll, doesn't break apart, and turns out extremely soft and fluffy, just like the real deal.Low Carb Cinnamon Rolls using Psyllium … [Read more...] about Sugar Free Low Carb Keto Cinnamon Rolls (Dairy Free Option)
The researchers tracked biomarkers that helped them ensure that the participants stuck to their diets. They also worked with a large food service company, Sodexo, to prepare thousands of generally healthful meals that the subjects could eat in cafeterias or take home with them. A typical meal for the high-carb group might consist of a chicken burrito bowl with rice and vegetables, for example, or roasted turkey with green beans and mashed potatoes. The low-carb group would get a similar meal with fewer carbohydrates, like a chicken burrito lettuce wrap or roasted turkey with green beans and mashed cauliflower.
Carbohydrates are a type of nutrient made up of simple sugars (monosaccharides) that bind together to form complex molecules. Depending on how the sugars are combined, they might create disaccharides (double sugars like lactose and sucrose), oligosaccharides (short chain sugars called glycoproteins and glycolipids), and polysaccharides (long chain sugars, like starch and cellulose).

I used your recipe yesterday. I organic unsweetened chocolate, but threw away the package so I can’t say what brand. I also used equal exchange organic baking cocoa. I found food-grade cocoa butter by NOW in the baking section of my local health food store. I decided to give it a go. The substitution I made was to use xylitol. It wasn’t powdered, however, it was granulated. I thought it would melt in the chocolate. NOT the case. So, my first batch I made I used all the same measurements and the xylitol made the chocolate grainy. I had enough ingredients to make it again. But the second time around I added only one tablespoon of xylitol. It melted just fine. But the chocolate wasn’t quite sweet enough. So, I added another tablespoon. But then I ended up with grainy-ness again. And the second batch is now closer to a semi-sweet or 70% dark chocolate sweetness (which I prefer). I expect that the grainy-ness will be present in the chips if I bake them. Ultimately, these have great flavor and will satisfy my occasional cravings. Wondering if I found a powdered xylitol, if that would solve the melting issue.
Think about it: That tablespoon of maple syrup in your salad dressing, the honey in your Asian-inspired stir-fry sauce, the generous drizzle of ketchup on your burger. Despite many people’s best efforts, that sugar still manages to creep into so many healthy dinner dishes. But meals can be just as tasty and easy to make without the slightest hint of added sweetener. We’ve rounded up 25 added-sugar-free dinners proving just that.
Milk chocolate is solid chocolate made with milk added in the form of powdered milk, liquid milk, or condensed milk. In 1875, a Swiss confectioner, Daniel Peter, developed the first solid milk chocolate using condensed milk, which had been invented by Henri Nestlé, who was Peter's neighbour in Vevey.[2][3] The US Government requires a 10% concentration of chocolate liquor. EU regulations specify a minimum of 25% cocoa solids. However, an agreement was reached in 2000 that allowed an exception from these regulations in the UK, Ireland, and Malta, where "milk chocolate" can contain only 20% cocoa solids. Such chocolate is labelled as "family milk chocolate" elsewhere in the European Union.[4] Cadbury is the leading brand of milk chocolate in the United Kingdom.[5][6] The Hershey Company is the largest producer in the US. The actual Hershey process is a trade secret, but experts speculate that the milk is partially lipolyzed, producing butyric acid, and then the milk is pasteurized, stabilizing it for use. This process gives the product a particular taste, to which the US public has shown to have an affinity, to the extent that some rival manufacturers now add butyric acid to their milk chocolates.[3]
Hi, I am Carine! I am a French mum living in Auckland, NZ. I am the sweet tooth creator of this place. I have been sugar free and low carb for 5 years, I love to share with you my sugar free ( and refined sugar free) nourishing recipes to make you feel energized, lighter and happier. I also love to encourage you to eat more greens in a fun and simple way. Enjoy what you see. XOXO Carine. Read More…
7 carbs additional carbs devided by 16 servings? 0.43 additional carbs per serving. Definitely still low carb. I am on a low carb not a no carb diet. This delicious low carb recipe has helped me (in part) lose 45 pounds and still get my dessert fix at the end of a low carb meal. I do not think I could do a low carb diet if I had to give up sweets! It freezes well when saved in individual servings or keeps in the fridge for days. Well done!
Like Water for Chocolate (Como agua para chocolate), a 1989 love story by novelist Laura Esquivel, was adapted to film in 1992. The plot incorporates magical realism with Mexican cuisine, and the title is a double entendre in its native language, referring both to a recipe for hot chocolate and to an idiom that is a metaphor for sexual arousal. The film earned 11 Ariel Awards from the Academia Mexicana de Artes y Ciencias Cinematográficas, including Best Picture.
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