This is designed to be dark chocolate, meaning heavy on the cocoa and light on the sweetener. The high cocoa-to-sweetener ratio means you can taste the complex, almost-(pleasantly-)burned flavor of the bitter roasted cocoa. But if you’re not a person who loves 72%-85% dark chocolate bars, this might not be the chocolate for you. If you are, you’ll love the great taste of this pleasantly bitter homemade sugar free dark chocolate.
I’m so glad I finally tried this recipe! I like Lily’s too, but they are expensive and the prebiotic inulin in them means I have to use them sparingly or I really suffer later. I even ordered the chip mold and some bar molds from Amazon! I can’t wait to try them, they should arrive today. This morning I made a batch using an 8×8 pan and I can’t wait to have some homemade chocolate for dessert.

These soft and fluffy low carb buns are made with psyllium husk powder and taste just like multigrain bread. Originally published in 2016, I've updated this recipe with better instructions and pictures.The Best Psyllium Husk Bread I've Made So Far Experimenting with  has proved to be quite … [Read more...] about Keto Low Carb Buns with Psyllium Husk
Processed chocolate products made from chocolate material itself or containing at least 60% chocolate material. Processed chocolate products must contain at least 40% chocolate material by weight. Amongst processed chocolate products, those containing at least 10% by weight of cream and no more than 10% of water can be called raw chocolate (生チョコレート nama chokorēto)
Asian-inspired food is delicious, but unfortunately, tends to use alarming amounts of added sugar, such as honey or sweetened sauces. This one gets its not-too-sweet flavor from a blend of rice vinegar and peanut powder (use peanut butter as an alternative)—it’s so good and so easy, you may want to bottle some of it for future stir-fries and salads.

Low-carbohydrate diet advocates including Gary Taubes and David Ludwig have proposed a "carbohydrate-insulin hypothesis" in which carbohydrate is said to be uniquely fattening because it raises insulin levels and so causes fat to accumulate unduly.[28][8] The hypothesis appears to run counter to known human biology whereby there is no good evidence of any such association between the actions of insulin and fat accumulation and obesity.[6] The hypothesis predicted that low-carbohydrate dieting would offer a "metabolic advantage" of increased energy expenditure equivalent to 400-600 kcal/day, in accord with the promise of the Atkin's diet: a "high calorie way to stay thin forever".[8]
×