When you buy chocolate chips, or even many chocolate bars, they contain additives like soy lecithin to make them shelf stable or hold a shape (like chips that stay chip-shaped when you heat them) or resist “bloom” – that light brown or white-ish powdery look that chocolate gets when it is old or freezer burned or heated and cooled too quickly. You’ll see a teeny bit of it on these chocolates, but it doesn’t affect the taste or enjoyment of the chocolate in the slightest. And it’s a sign of the simple composition of these chocolates.
The extent to which people will benefit from greater carbohydrate reduction has to do with how well our individual bodies handle carbohydrate, as sugars and starches in our food all end up as sugars in our bodies. The science is clear that people with a related cluster of issues including insulin resistance, prediabetes, type 2 diabetes, and metabolic syndrome are more likely to benefit from low-carb diets than from other dietary approaches. (It's worth pointing out that most people with these conditions do not know it.) This also includes people with so-called normal weight obesity.
 But besides the cost of buying healthier chocolate at stores let’s talk about cravings shall we?! Giving in to chocolate cravings can be the biggest downfall when it comes to practicing a healthy lifestyle and/or trying to lose weight. But not indulging in chocolate just because you might lead a sugar free way of life or think you can’t possibly have it now that you need to lose weight, could put someone into depression! The key factor here is not so much enjoying chocolate, but it’s about the kind you are enjoying .
When you buy chocolate chips, or even many chocolate bars, they contain additives like soy lecithin to make them shelf stable or hold a shape (like chips that stay chip-shaped when you heat them) or resist “bloom” – that light brown or white-ish powdery look that chocolate gets when it is old or freezer burned or heated and cooled too quickly. You’ll see a teeny bit of it on these chocolates, but it doesn’t affect the taste or enjoyment of the chocolate in the slightest. And it’s a sign of the simple composition of these chocolates.
The most commonly grown bean is forastero,[49] a large group of wild and cultivated cacaos, most likely native to the Amazon basin. The African cocoa crop is entirely of the forastero variety. They are significantly hardier and of higher yield than criollo. The source of most chocolate marketed,[49] forastero cocoas are typically strong in classic "chocolate" flavor, but have a short duration and are unsupported by secondary flavors, producing "quite bland" chocolate.[49]
Did you taste the mixture before you let it harden in the mold? If it was bitter to you before letting it harden, you needed more sweetener. For some getting used to stevia is a big transition. I use the vanilla liquid stevia by the brand Sweetleaf. I have tried Trader Joe’s vanilla stevia but I didn’t like it as much as Sweetleaf. Also different brands of liquid stevia are made differently and the way they are processed to form the liquid will produce different levels of sweetness. NuNaturals vanilla stevia is much sweeter than Sweetleaf. Don’t dump out your bottle but try other recipes with it and hopefully you can use it up and not feel you wasted your money on it. I’m sorry you didn’t like the recipe.
Couverture chocolate is a high-quality class of dark chocolate, containing a high percentage of cocoa solids and cocoa butter, and precisely tempered. Couverture chocolate is used by professionals for dipping, coating, molding and garnishing ('couverture' means 'covering' in French). Popular brands of couverture chocolate used by pastry chefs include: Valrhona, Lindt & Sprüngli, Scharffen Berger, Callebaut, and Guittard.
I couldn’t find unsweetened chocolate in Australia so I added more cocoa butter and cocoa powder (1 oz of each). Delicious! I don’t mind the graininess at all and added a bit of dedicated coconut to mask it! Even my husband who hates dark chocolate likes this one and 20g (85 cals) is enough to satisfy my sweet tooth after dinner. Can’t wait to try making different flavours by adding different things to it.
Hi Leila, I think you could, but I haven’t tried it. I’d recommend a powdered sweetener (Swerve Confectioner’s or Sukrin Melis) if you do this, so that the chocolate pudding layer is smooth. The replacement for the dark chocolate in the pudding layer should be approximately 1/2 cup cocoa powder, 1 1/2 tbsp butter, and 3 tbsp powdered sweetener (may need to adjust to taste). Let me know how it goes if you try it!
My husband and I did sugar-free January, including giving up honey and maple syrup (we did keep wine and unsweetened dried fruit!). It was hard at times, but ultimately super rewarding for both of us! We both dropped a few lbs., and I was able to kick my gross flavored-coffeemate-plus-an-extra-spoonful-of-sugar habit, and am now drinking my coffee unsweetened with just a big splash of half and half (thanks for that tip!).
This is going to become a Christmas Day staple at our house. We celebrate our Southern Hemisphere Christmases with beach visits and sprinkler play, and turning on the oven for more than ten minutes seems very wrong when it’s 37 degrees C. I managed to whip this up on Christmas morning (we had a quiet one this year). It tasted amazing and looked beautifully festive. Thanks to the detailed instructions, I managed the pudding bit with very few lumps and felt very proud. The finished product is huge – I agree that it would be great for a special occasion; there’s really too much for one family unless you have a lot of people around. I made it circular like a pie and stuck the leftovers in the freezer – it froze beautifully, and tasted like ice-cream cake when frozen. The one thing I would do differently next time is to make the first two layers the day before as the method suggests. It wasn’t really cold and set enough to layer the cream on easily and I had to be super careful not to mess up the chocolate pudding layer.
When preparing sugar free cookies for diabetics, your first priority is to eliminate as much of the sugar as you can from the recipe. But what to replace it with? One of the best options is sucralose, because it’s heat-stable, meaning it doesn’t lose sweetness when exposed to high baking temperatures. Interestingly, sucralose is made from sugar, but is not metabolized by the body like sugar is, which makes it a good choice in sugar free cookie recipes for diabetics. It’s available at a reasonable price in almost all supermarkets, in both store brands and under the brand label Splenda.

The final process is called tempering. Uncontrolled crystallization of cocoa butter typically results in crystals of varying size, some or all large enough to be clearly seen with the naked eye. This causes the surface of the chocolate to appear mottled and matte, and causes the chocolate to crumble rather than snap when broken.[63][64] The uniform sheen and crisp bite of properly processed chocolate are the result of consistently small cocoa butter crystals produced by the tempering process.
Hi! Love this post and concept. I am currently in the midst of a refined grains/sugar-free December. While it was a little bit difficult at first to not indulge in all the holiday treats, I am feeling really good + loving the REAL food + down several pounds. Feeling so good that I think I’m going to continue into January + look forward to following along your journey/getting more yummy recipes! 🙂
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